Environment, nutrition and health – Anna Bergström's research group

Our research aims to advance the knowledge on how environmental and nutritional factors influence health, in particular development of asthma and allergies and cardiometabolic markers in the first decades of life. Moreover, we conduct research on health consequences of allergic diseases and COVID-19. The majority of the research is conducted within the prospective cohort BAMSE where 4,089 children have been followed repeatedly from infancy (1994-1996).

Publications

All publications from group members

Staff and contact

Group leader

All members of the group

Visiting address

Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nobels väg 13, Solna, Sweden

Postal address

Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Box 210, Stockholm, SE-17177, Sweden

Projects

From fetal life to early adulthood: tobacco exposure, nutrition and health

Tobacco exposure and diet are important determinants of health. Still, we need to better understand how exposure in fetal life, childhood and adolescence influence health in adulthood. The proposed project will investigate the role of secondhand smoke exposure, cigarette smoking, snus consumption, diet and overweight for respiratory, allergic and cardiovascular outcomes during the first 24 years of life. The research is conducted within a prospective population-based cohort (BAMSE) where 4,089 males and females have been followed repeatedly from infancy. Extensive information on exposures and outcomes are available from questionnaires, clinical examinations and blood samples. The proposed project builds on and extends recent findings from my research group. The project will contribute to the understanding of how tobacco exposure, diet and obesity influence health outcomes in early adulthood, and possibly provide a basis for disease prevention efforts.

Financing

  • The Swedish Research Council
  • The Swedish Research Council for Health Working Life and Welfare
  • Region Stockholm (AFL)
  • KID-funding from Karolinska Institutet 

Contact person

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Anna Bergström

Senior Lecturer

Can asthma and atopic dermatitis in childhood influence the risk of cardiometabolic conditions in early adulthood?

Allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis and rhinitis are the most common non-communicable diseases in childhood. Allergic diseases and their multimorbidity in childhood are often associated with further respiratory problems in adult life, such as lower lung function and higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, increasing body of literature also suggest that allergic diseases may also influence the development of other non-communicable diseases, for example cardiovascular and metabolic conditions (e.g. obesity, high blood pressure and elevated blood lipids). However, prospective studies ranging from childhood to adulthood and with detailed phenotyping of allergic diseases are needed to better understand these potential associations. The objective of the proposed project is to examine if childhood asthma and atopic dermatitis influence the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic conditions detectable already in early adulthood. The project will be conducted within a prospective population-based cohort (BAMSE) where 4,089 males and females have been followed from infancy.

In the short term, our research will contribute to new knowledge on how childhood asthma and atopic dermatitis may influence the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic conditions in early adulthood. In the long term, our results may have important implications for the treatment standards of children with asthma and atopic dermatitis and thereby contribute to the prevention of cardiometabolic conditions.

Financing

  • The Swedish Asthma and Allergy research foundation

Contact person

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Anna Bergström

Senior Lecturer

COVID-19 in young adults; risk factors, immunity and long-term health consequences

In this project, we perform  COVID-19 focused follow-ups of participants in our longitudinal, population-based birth cohort BAMSE (born 1994-96) including repeated serology analyses of coronavirus immunity, risk factor assessment, elucidations of underlying genetic and immunological factor, and new assessment of lung function and cardiometabolic markers to evaluate long term pulmonary and cardiometabolic effects. In the BAMSE study, we have a unique opportunity to study both short-term and long-term health consequences of coronavirus infection, thanks to our rich, longitudinal database and biobank, to evaluate key risk factors and health consequences of coronavirus infection.

Financing

  • Karolinska Institutet
  • The Swedish Research Council

Contact persons

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Anna Bergström

Senior Lecturer
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Sandra Ekström

Postdoctoral Researcher;Affiliated to Research
Keywords:
Allergy and Immunology Asthma Birth Cohort Diet, Food, and Nutrition Environmental Exposure Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Show all
Anna Persson
25-03-2024