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Research group for Cancer evolution

We study structural aspects of cancer proteins that make them targets for disease-causing mutations as well as their function in cancer cells. We also study how cellular interactions in micro-environments affect the function of cancer proteins.

Cancer is an evolutionary disease. Disease-causing genetic or epigenetic changes often alter the functional characteristics of regulatory proteins leading to survival and proliferation of cancer cells at the expense of normal cells. The cancer-driving properties of cancer cells are selected for in specific cellular micro-environments by Darwinian natural selection. We study structural aspects of cancer proteins that make them targets for disease-causing mutations as well as their function in cancer cells. We also study how cellular interactions in micro-environments affect the function of cancer proteins. The work is relevant for understanding cancer development as well as development of resistance to chemotherapy. The work is focused on cancers involving blood cells.

Research group leader Anthony Wright

Professor

Anthony Wright

Enhet: Kliniskt forskningscentrum
E-post: anthony.wright@ki.se

Group members

Gustav ArvidssonForskarstuderande
Laia SadeghiPostdoc
Anthony WrightProfessor

Research techniques

  • Molecular cell biology
  • Cell culture
  • Genomics
  • Bioinformatics

External funding

Swedish Research Council, Cancerfonden

Selected publications

Origins of Myc proteins--using intrinsic protein disorder to trace distant relatives.
Mahani A, Henriksson J, Wright A
PLoS ONE 2013 ;8(9):e75057

21771306

HAT-HDAC interplay modulates global histone H3K14 acetylation in gene-coding regions during stress.
Johnsson A, Durand-Dubief M, Xue-Franzén Y, Rönnerblad M, Ekwall K, Wright A
EMBO Rep. 2009 Sep;10(9):1009-14

c-Myc induces changes in higher order rDNA structure on stimulation of quiescent cells.
Shiue C, Berkson R, Wright A
Oncogene 2009 Apr;28(16):1833-42

c-Myc associates with ribosomal DNA and activates RNA polymerase I transcription.
Arabi A, Wu S, Ridderstråle K, Bierhoff H, Shiue C, Fatyol K, et al
Nat. Cell Biol. 2005 Mar;7(3):303-10