High-intensity resistance training in PwMS experiencing fatigue - effects on functioning, wellbeing and inflammatory biological markers.

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of high-intensity resistance training on functioning, wellbeing/health-related quality of life and inflammatory biological markers in persons with MS-fatigue

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system. One of the most common and disabling symptom is fatigue. In persons with MS, fatigue is associated with activity limitations, participation restrictions and reduced health-related quality of life. MS-fatigue might be related directly to the disease, where increased levels of inflammatory biological markers (cytokines) contribute. Resistance training might have direct effects on the MS disease by modulating cytokine levels, where a higher training-intensity is thought to have a more profound effect. There are, however, a lack of high-quality studies on effects of high-intensity resistance training in persons with MS who suffer from MS-fatigue.

Aim

To evaluate the effects of high-intensity resistance training on functioning, wellbeing/health-related quality of life and inflammatory biological markers in persons with MS-fatigue

Method

A randomized controlled trial is planned where persons with moderate-to-severe MS-fatigue are randomly assigned to training once or twice a week. The training consists of a 12-week high-intensity resistance training programme supervised by physiotherapist. Data will be collected before and immediately after the training period. By use of questionnaires and analyses of inflammatory markers in blood, we will be able to evaluate if the intervention leads to decreased fatigue (primary outcome), improved functioning, better health-related quality of life and has an anti-inflammatory effect, and if there is a difference related to training frequency.

Significance

If the intervention has positive effects, the knowledge will be directly beneficial for persons with MS-fatigue for example in form of clinical treatment guidelines. Furthermore, the training can easily be implemented in both healthcare and preventive health care.

Principal Investigator

Marie Kierkegaard

Senior lecturer/physcial therapist