Road Traffic Injury Prevention and Care in Tanzania | ISAC

A collaboration between ISAC members, Umeå University and Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences.

Aim

The overall aim of this research-training programme is to build sustainable research capacity to advance knowledge about mechanisms and dynamics of road traffic injuries in Tanzania. A series of complementary research projects address individual, social and environmental risk factors of road traffic injuries and the provision of care after an injury.

The number of road traffic injuries has increased rapidly in Tanzania since the 1990s and both mortality and morbidity data show that they contribute to a substantial part of death and burden of disease in the country. An increased understanding of the burden and circumstances of road traffic injuries in the specific context of Tanzania will allow for more targeted interventions.

Grant from Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (2016-2022)

Publications

Pedestrians' Perception of Pedestrian Bridges-A Qualitative Study in Dar es Salaam.
Katopola D, Mashili F, Hasselberg M
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 01;19(3):

Investigation of road infrastructure and traffic density attributes at high-risk locations for motorcycle-related injuries using multiple correspondence and cluster analysis in urban Tanzania.
Francis F, Moshiro C, Hans Yngve B, Hasselberg M
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot 2021 Dec;28(4):428-438

Association between alcohol consumption, marijuana use and road traffic injuries among commercial motorcycle riders: A population-based, case-control study in Dares Salaam, Tanzania.
Kiwango G, Francis F, Moshiro C, Möller J, Hasselberg M
Accid Anal Prev 2021 Sep;160():106325

Perception of unsafe driving behaviour and reported driving behaviour among commercial motorcyclists in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Transportation Research Part F – Traffic Psychology and Behaviour.
Kiwango G, Francis F, Hasselberg M, Chillo O, Moshiro C.
DOI: 10.1016/j.trf.2020.08.011.

Contact person for the project

Marie Hasselberg

Professor
K9 Department of Global Public Health