Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education

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This major international Prize is awarded for outstanding research in medical education. The purpose of the Prize is to recognize and stimulate high-quality research in the field, and to promote long-term improvements in educational practice. "Medical" includes all education and training for any health science profession. The Prize is presented every second year.

Why study medical education?

Medical education is an important undertaking because sooner or later we all become patients. The quality of the care we receive depends on the skills of the health professionals who treat us. The foundation for this competence is the quality of the education they receive. Medical practice is continuously assessed and improved by research. Similarly, medical education must be research-based, testing innovations as well as current practices.

Why a prize for research in medical education?

Numerous prizes are given for research excellence in many fields of medicine and health care. These prizes call attention to important progress in our knowledge and honour scientists who have made this progress possible. In spite of the crucial importance of medical education for the skills of the health professionals, and the considerable costs of this education in terms of time and money, this field is largely unexplored. The Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education attempts to highlight medical education as an important area of research and to recognize those who contribute to learning by sharing their findings with the health-care community.

Funding and selection of the Prize winner

The Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education is financed by the Gunnar Höglund and Anna-Stina Malmborg Foundation, which was established in 2001. The stipulations in the Foundation’s statutes were formulated jointly by Karolinska Institutet and the founders. The Foundation undertakes to fund the awarded prize sum (currently € 50,000). The prize winner is selected by Karolinska Institutet (and formally approved by the Foundation). The founders are MDs/PhDs and have been active within Karolinska Institutet for many years.

Previous prize winners

Prize winner 2014

John Norcini, 2014 Professor John Norcini is awarded the 2014 Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education for his important contributions to research in medical education, especially his pioneering research on knowledge decay, specialty certification and the development of new methods of assessment.

Professor Norcini, president of the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER), located in Philadelphia in the US, will receive the award and a prize amount of €50,000 at a ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden, on 17 October.

Prize seminar 2014: Well-managed education will improve the quality and capacity of healthcare systems, by John J. Norcini Jr.

Norcini seminar 2014

Press release

Prize winner 2012

Professor Cees van der Vleuten, Chair of the Department of Educational Development and Research at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, is awarded the 2012 Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education for his research in evaluation and assessment of medical competences. Professor van der Vleuten’s work has focused since the 1980s on how to evaluate what a student has actually learned. Assessment drives all learning and all curricula, all around the world, and Professor van der Vleuten has developed a method outlining how assessment can be used as part of an education strategy. He is also an outstanding research mentor.

Symposium 2012: What Research has to say about Assessment, by Cees van der Vleuten

Press release

Prize winners 2010

Professor Richard Reznick (center), Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, receives the prize for his work in surgical education, including the development of approaches to assessing surgical competence, as well as his role in the development of a surgical safety checklist. This is used globally today and has proved to improve considerably surgical success.

Professor David Irby (right), Vice Dean for Education at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, United States, receives the prize for his finding that medical expertise is necessary, yet insufficient, to become a great teacher in medicine.

Press release

Prize winner 2008

The Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education 2008 was awarded to Geoffrey R. Norman, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

The Karolinska Institutet Prize Committee sees Professor Geoff Norman as a highly original and innovative researcher in the field of medical education. His research has had a significant impact on our understanding of the development of expertise in clinical medicine. Furthermore, his research has yielded important contributions to our knowledge of the complexity of pattern recognition, clinical reasoning and clinical problem solving. His scientific originality and insights extend into numerous related areas of medicine and cognition, in particular areas such as assessment of learning outcomes and clinical performance, visual perception, and curriculum design. Dr Norman’s studies have provided a deep insight into research-based reforms in medical curricula worldwide.

Press release

Prize winner 2006

Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education 2006 was awarded to Ronald M. Harden, Professor, OBE MD FRCP (GLAS.) FRCS (ED.) FRCPC, Dundee, Scotland.

The Karolinska Institutet Prize Committee has recognized Professor Ronald Harden as an innovative researcher in medical education and a prolific thinker. His ideas have been tested and put into practice in medical schools around the world. He has made, and continues to make, outstanding contributions to the broad field of medical education, particularly in the areas of assessment methods, curriculum design, and evidence- and information-technology-based medical education. His scientific work has promoted excellence in medical education worldwide.

Prize winner 2004

The Prize was awarded to Professor Henk G. Schmidt, Rector Magnificus and Honorary Professor of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

As seen by the Karolinska Institutet Prize Committee, Professor Schmidt’s research in the field of medical education is outstanding and highly original. His special research areas are problem-based learning, clinical reasoning, and the acquisition of expertise in medicine. They cover the whole range from undergraduate studies to expertise in professional practice. Professor Schmidt’s work has had a great impact on the research field, and many of his former students have become prominent and influential researchers. His studies have inspired applications in not only problem-based learning, but have promoted student-centred practices in general. Professor Schmidt’s research has influenced medical education worldwide. His influence goes beyond the field of medical education into education.

Guidelines for Nomination

Please download the Guidelines and read the instructions. When you are ready to submit your nomination(s), do as instructed in the Guidelines. You will receive an email that confirms your submission.

For further information, please contact the Scientific Secretary of the Karolinska Institutet Prize Committee, Associate Professor Italo Masiello, email: italo.masiello@ki.se.

Thank you for nominating colleagues, who by their distinguished research have made important contributions to progress in medical education.

Prize Committee Members

Chair of the Prize Committee

Professor/överläkare

Sari Ponzer

Telefon: 08-616 23 46
Enhet: Institutionen för klinisk forskning och utbildning, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), S1
E-post: sari.ponzer@ki.se

Scientific Secretary of the Prize Committee

Universitetslektor

Italo Masiello

E-post: Italo.Masiello@ki.se

Members of the committee

  • Senior lecturer Klara Bolander Laksov, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
  • Professor Stefan Lindgren, Lund University, Sweden
  • Dr. Madalena Patricio, University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Professor Ed Peile, University of Warwick, UK
  • Professor Charlotte Ringsted, Aarhus University, Denmark
  • Senior lecturer Charlotte Silén, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
  • Senior lecturer Annika Östman Wernerson, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Contact

Correspondence to the Prize Committee, other than nominations, should be directed to:

Scientific Secretary, Italo Masiello
Phone: 076 052 80 27
E-mail: Italo.Masiello@ki.se

Coordinator, Philip Malmgren
Phone: 08-524 865 28
E-mail: Philip.Malmgren@ki.se

Prize