"I'm glad it's over"

Mia Yombi 

Age: 38.  

Occupation: Works as an architect. 

Diagnosis: Pelvic girdle pain. 

Bild på Moa Yombi.
Moa Yombi. Foto: Jonas Malmström.

When I was pregnant with my second child, I had extreme pelvic girdle pain. Four months into the pregnancy, I found it hard to walk, sit and stand. At around 25 weeks, I went on sick leave. I don’t remember – those months are a blur to me.  

For the last four months I was in crazy pain, the peak of the pain was worse than labour. It was in my lumbar spine and groin and was agony the whole time, but it got worse with the slightest strain, even taking a single step. The thud from the step felt like someone was pulling my legs off. I really can’t describe it properly. 

I got a TENS machine from the midwife clinic and a sheet of physiotherapy exercises. They didn’t help at all. I got some relief when my sister gave me some alternative therapy - craniosacral therapy. In the end, I got morphine; that was the only thing that got me through the day.  

When I went to see the midwife, I’d have to go in an taxi to the hospital. I would then be picked up at the entrance in a wheelchair or stretcher. 

My husband did everything at home and when he was forced to work, my parents moved in. The few times I picked up my son, I used the car that we had bought with my condition in mind – it had higher seats and was easier to climb into.   

As soon as the baby was born, I was in less pain. I could walk after a few hours. It’s now been two years and I have completely recovered.  

I wish I had got a more caring response from the healthcare services. I realise that it’s hard to give a reassuring answer because some people have permanent issues. But if you can’t give that, you can at least show greater understanding.  

I also needed to go on sick leave earlier. I think I would have been better off if I had rested more at the start when I was in real pain.” 

As told to: Annika Lund, first published in Swedish in the magazine Medicinsk Vetenskap no 3/2021.