Mechanism of T cell damage during HIV infection

The work of our group aims at understanding the pathogenesis of cell damage during HIV infection which occurs through the direct effect of the virus and indirect mechanisms. These dysfunctions, central to HIV pathogenesis and including several types of immune cells, are molecularly not completely understood; a large number of non-infected T cells die during HIV infection. It is important to characterize the mechanisms leading to cell damage during HIV infection to design future HIV therapy.

Open Project Groups within the Francesca Chiodi configuration options

The work of our group aims at understanding the pathogenesis of cell damage during HIV infection which occurs through the direct effect of the virus and indirect mechanisms. These dysfunctions, central to HIV pathogenesis and including several types of immune cells, are molecularly not completely understood; a large number of non-infected T cells die during HIV infection. It is important to characterize the mechanisms leading to cell damage during HIV infection to design future HIV therapy.

Our recent work has been focused on the extensive phenotyping and transcriptome analyses of naïve and memory T cells from HIV infected patients, including the process of T cell differentiation, according to initiation of anti-retroviral therapy (VR supported). We also participate in a HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial (CHAPS) conducted in men in Sub-Saharan Africa where our role is to study tissue transcriptomic and proteomic changes taking place following PrEP administration (supported from EDCTP and VR).

Project Groups within the Francesca Chiodi

Maria Issagouliantis