Articles - division of psychology

Here you will find selected articles from the division's research groups

This pilot study indicates that inflammation affects the ability to regulate emotions towards unpleasant stimuli. It also suggests difficulties in reappraising disgust-related stimuli.

 

This study shows that sleepiness reduces the likelihood of engaging in social activities, as well as the duration of such activities. Being sleepy reduces the probability of being socially active with as much as 70% compared to when being alert.

 

Our findings indicate that sleepiness is a dynamic motivational drive that promotes sleep-preparatory behaviors and competes with other drives and desired outcomes. A theoretical framework on sleepiness and its behavioral consequences are likely to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms.

 

This study shows that biological motion (e.g. walking speed, stride length, arm, leg, head, and shoulder angles) contains clear information about the inflammatory status of an individual.

 

This study shows that social safety learning is optimized by a combination of direct conditioned stimulus exposure and vicariously transmitted safety signals. Our work might help identify psychological and social strategies that can be used to counteract maladaptive fears in humans.

 

Results from a meta-analysis of 193 studies show a small increased risk of depression, anxiety, distress, and problematic eating, as well as, a reversed decreased risk of substance use problems.

 

Gay and bisexual men face stress related to competition and specific demands around masculinity, attractiveness, power, and status that can put a major strain on their mental health.

 

Transgender individuals seeking gender affirming care in Sweden are at greater risk of mental health problems, but the likelihood of receiving treatment for depression or anxiety is reduced as a function of number of years since last gender affirming surgery.

 

We show that individuals with autism spectrum disorder, ASD, (versus healthy controls) display stronger vicarious threat learning in spite of less attention to the demonstrators' face. ASD might impair the ability to downregulate threat responses in social situations. Our findings also show that vicarious threat learning does not require a typically developed social cognition.

 

We demonstrate that high threat imminence (immediate risk of another person receiving a shock) facilitated helping behavior. Our findings suggest that, just like higher threat imminence fosters active avoidance from self-directed threats (fight-or-flight), it may promote helping when others are under threat.

 

This research investigates the algorithms by which people learn how reliable social partners' advice is about potentially dangerous choice options and how they can repeatedly leverage that information in novel environments.

 

Our findings indicate that sleepiness is a dynamic motivational drive that promotes sleep-preparatory behaviors and competes with other drives and desired outcomes. A theoretical framework on sleepiness and its behavioral consequences are likely to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms.  

 

This study shows that sleepiness reduces the likelihood of engaging in social activities, as well as the duration of such activities. Being sleepy reduces the probability of being socially active with as much as 70% compared to when being alert.

 

This study shows that biological motion (e.g. walking speed, stride length, arm, leg, head, and shoulder angles) contains clear information about the inflammatory status of an individual.