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Influence of genes and environments for gestational problems and outcomes

Project leader: Paul Lichtenstein

Project description

Complications in connection with pregnancy and delivery can create large suffering for afflicted individuals, and contribute to a large part of the costs for the health care system for women in fertile ages. However, the etiology of many gestational outcomes is still unknown. In this project we want to study genetic-familial effects of pregnancy complications and the health of the newborn child.

The Swedish Multi-Generation Register (including information on all children born in Sweden since 1932 together with their parents) will be linked to the Swedish Medical Birth Register. From the birth register information on gestational outcomes from 1973 will be collected (about 2.5 million deliveries). Analyses will be done on a de-identified dataset with genetic epidemiological methodology. We will also develop new methodological methods to analyze this complex dataset.

The purpose is to for gestational complications and outcomes study

if there is a familial risk
the relative importance of genes and environments
if there is a common genetic and/or environmental etiology for different types of complications
the importance of the father for the outcome
how social factors contribute
identify families that can be used for molecular genetic studies.

For both prevention and treatment it is of uttermost importance to better understand how genes and environments influence gestational complications and outcomes.

Main financing

FAS

Partners

Sven Cnattingius, MEB

Yudi Pawitan, MEB

Marie Reilly, MEB

References

Pawitan, Y., Reilly, M., Nilsson, E., Cnattingius, S. & Lichtenstein, P. (2004). Estimation of genetic and environmental factors for binary traits using family data. Statistics in Medicine, 449-465.

Nilsson, E., Salonen Ros, H., Cnattingius, S. & Lichtenstein, P. (2004). The importance of genetic and environmental effects for pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension - A family study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 111, 200-206.

Algovik, M., Nilsson, E., Cnattingius, S., Lichtenstein, P., Nordenskjöld, A. & Westgren, M. (2004). Genetic influence on dystocia. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 83, 832-837.

Cnattingius, S., Reilly, M., Pawitan, Y. & Lichtenstein, P. (2004). Maternal and fetal genetic account for most of familial aggregation of preeclampsia: A population-based Swedish cohort study. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 130A, 365-371.

Pawitan, Y., Reilly, M., Nilsson, E., Cnattingius, S. & Lichtenstein, P. (2005). Estimation of genetic and environmental factors for binary traits using family data. Authors reply. Statistics in Medicine, 24:1617-8.

Svensson, A.C., Pawitan, Y., Cnattingius, S., MD, Reilly, M. & Lichtenstein, P. (2006). Familial aggregation of small for gestational age births: The importance of fetal genetic effects. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 194, 475-9.