“I suddenly could not remember what I had read”

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Although Bengt Malmsten from Halmstad was only 58 years old, his knee was so worn down from osteoarthritis that it no longer worked. He was anesthetised and a whole new knee replacement was operated in on his leg. The surgery went well, but he did not feel quite right afterwards.

Although Bengt Malmsten from Halmstad was only 58 years old, his knee was so worn down from osteoarthritis that it no longer worked. He was anesthetised and a whole new knee replacement was operated in on his leg. The surgery went well, but he did not feel quite right afterwards.

“I had brought some books  with me to read at the hospital, but couldn’t. I had trouble focusing on the text and had to read the same paragraph over and over again,” says Bengt Malmsten.

It’s now over two years since he had the surgery and he remembers that he did not react too much to the changes he experienced.

“I was given morphine after the surgery and was a little woolly so it all was not so strange, I thought then. But I have heard afterwards, that morphine was not supposed act in this way,” he adds.

The problems with memory and concentration lasted for a few weeks and after a few more weeks he was back at work at the Volvo dealer in Halmstad.

“I have learnt afterwards that this state can remain for quite a long time for some,” he says.

However, it was nothing he had received information about prior to surgery. Yet he didn’t think it really mattered, quite the opposite.

“No, it would have been just one more thing to worry about. Had I known that this can last for half a year then I would only have worried whether it would pass or not,” he concludes.

Anesthesiology and Intensive Care