Completed EU projects coordinated at Karolinska Institutet

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ARCADE-HSSR – Development of Health care systems in Africa

  • Project name: African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research
  • FP7 Health - Coordination and support actions (CSA)
  • Project period: 2011-04-01 - 2015-03-31 (48 months)
  • Project funding: EUR 2 million
  • 7 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Vinod Diwan
  • ARCADE website

This project will add new research training capacity at Sub Saharan universities, for health systems and services (HSS) strengthening. HSS covers a range of topics, from health financing, to health workforce availability, service delivery and appropriate medical products and technologies. Research in this area is critical in Africa, where many health systems have chronically underperformed.

The focus is on doctoral and post doctoral training, institutional strengthening for education, financial and administrative research management, and South-South network building. Novel capacity building approaches will reduce brain drain, be more climate friendly and encourage gender equity with south based training.

ARCADE-RSDH – Social determinants of health in Asia

  • Project name: Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health
  • FP7 Health - Coordination and support actions (CSA)
  • Project period: 2011-12-01 - 2015-11-30 (48 months)
  • Project funding: EUR 2 million
  • 12 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Vinod Diwan
  • ARCADE website                                        

This project will build capacity for research into social determinants of health (RSDH). An individual's health depends heavily on the social and physical environment they inhabit, and health disparities are often symptomatic of wider social inequities. This is particularly challenging in Asia, home to some of the largest societies on Earth.

The focus is on doctoral and post doctoral training, institutional strengthening for education, financial and administrative research management, and LMICs-based network building. Novel capacity building approaches will reduce brain drain, be more climate friendly and encourage gender equity with LMICs-based training.

DDPDGENES – Dopamine neuron development

  • Project name: Identification of genes for human midbrain dopamine neuron development and Parkinson's disease
  • FP7 Health - Small or medium-scale focused research project
  • Project period: 2012-01-01 - 2015-12-31 (48 months)
  • Project funding: 2.82 million Euro
  • 5 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Sten Linnarsson
  • Project website                                        

The goal of DDPDGENES is to determine whether the expression of developmental genes in defined subpopulations of dopamine neurons contributes to the specification of currently unrecognized midbrain dopamine neuron subtypes and whether their missexpression may contribute to the loss of DA neurons in the adulthood and to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

EurocanPlatform – Translational cancer research

  • EurocanPlatform logoProject name: EuroCan - A European platform for translational cancer research
  • FP7 Health - Networks of Excellence
  • Project period: 2011-01-01 - 2015-12-31
  • Project funding: 12 million Euro
  • 28 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Ulrik Ringborg
  • Project website

EurocanPlatform is an EC funded project that will bring together 28 European cancer Institutions and organisations to work together in a unique collaboration. The centres will share infrastructures and collaborate on projects to help advance cancer research and treatment.

The overarching aim of the EurocanPlatform is to improve outcomes for cancer patients and reduce mortality, this will be achieved by focusing on three key areas of research: prevention, early detection and improved treatments.

EurocanPlatform will build the necessary resources and know-how to improve cancer care from bench to bedside: basic research, early and late translational research, clinical research, epidemiological research, implementation in care and population based outcome research.

IMPLEMENT – Implementation of chronic care improvements

  • Project name: Implementation of chronic care improvements
  • FP7 Health – Support Action (CSA-SA)
  • Project period: 2013-09-01 – 2015 08-31 (24 months)
  • Project funding: EUR 500 000
  • 4 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor John Øvretveit
  • Project website

IMPLEMENT wants to close the ‘knowledge gaps’ that prevent implementation projects to be a success. This paves the way to accelerating improvements in chronic care. IMPLEMENT invites experts in research, industry, policy and daily practice to contribute to – and benefit from – the project.

MATIND – Reducing maternal mortality in India

  • logo MATINDProject name: Large scale innovative pro-poor programs focused on reducing maternal mortality in India: a proposal for impact evaluation
  • FP7 Health - Small/medium-scale focused research project for specific cooperation actions dedicated to international cooperation partner countries (SICA)
  • Project period: 2011-04-01 - 2015-03-31 (48 månader)
  • Project funding: 2.97 million Euro
  • 5 partners
  • Coordinator: Dr. Ayesha de Costa
  • Project website                                        

The main objective of MATIND is to evaluate two innovative large scale programs, which were set up to decrease maternal mortality among women living below the poverty line in India. Two Indian programs (JSY - Janani Suraksha Yojanawere and CY - Chiranjeevi Yojana) started to reduce maternal deaths by promoting institutional delivery and reducing access barriers to maternal healthcare for poor women.

Each of these programs operates through the use of different innovative demand side financing mechanisms, which are specifically aimed at improving access for vulnerable groups. While both programs are based on similar concepts, i.e. financial incentives for the provision and utilization of care; and the participation of the private sector - there are major differences in the socioeconomic contexts in which each program operates, financing mechanisms, provider payment models and incentives, quantum of financial assistance, level of private sector involvement, all of which will have a bearing on desired maternal health outcomes. No such large scale demand side financing programs for maternal health have been evaluated before.

SYSCOL – Colorectal cancer

  • logo SYSCOLProject name: Systems Biology of Colorectal cancer
  • FP7 Health - Large-scale integrating project
  • Project period: 2011-01-01 - 2015-12-31 (60 months)
  • Project funding: 12 million Euro
  • 11 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Jussi Taipale
  • Project website                                         

The aim of the SYSCOL project is to identify the cellular events that are required for formation of colorectal cancer and to formulate a model for colorectal cancer development.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers. In Europe, it is the single most important cancer in terms of severity, number of cases, absence of effective screening programs and therapies, lack of a readily avoidable cause and cost for society. As morbidity and mortality rates due to colorectal cancer can be dramatically decreased by clinical screening and early intervention in predisposed individuals, methods that allow stratification of patient groups and identification of high-risk individuals have the potential to significantly decrease the death rate from colorectal cancer.

Specific aims of the SYSCOL project:

  • Identify genetic markers for individual risk using genotyping and sequencing of germline DNA from sporadic and familial colorectal cancer cases and controls.
  • Identify genes and regulatory elements that contribute to colorectal cancer cell growth.
  • Use data from Aims 1) and 2) to develop a quantitative model for colorectal tumor formation.
  • Apply the model for identification of high-risk individuals, for detailed classification of the disease and for identification of novel molecular treatment targets.

Systems Microscopy – Next-generation systems biology

  • Project name: Systems Microscopy - a key enabling methodology for next-generation systems biology
  • FP7 Health - Network of Excellence
  • Project period: 2011-01-01 - 2015-12-31 (60 months)
  • Project funding: 11.99 million Euro
  • 8 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Staffan Strömblad
  • Project website                                         

The project Systems Microscopy is a life science project spearheading a key enabling methodology based on live cell imaging for the development of next-generation systems biology.

Biological processes occur in space and time, but current experimental methods for systems biology are limited in their ability to resolve this spatiotemporal complexity of life. In addition, traditional "omics" methods often suffer from limited sensitivity and need to average over populations of cells at the expense of cell to cell variation. Next-generation systems biology therefore requires methods that can capture data and build models in four dimensions, three-dimensional space and time, and needs to address dynamic events in single living cells.

The Systems Microscopy will have as its core biological theme two basic but complex cellular processes that are highly relevant to human cancer: cell division and cell migration. Methods, strategies and tools established here will be applicable to many disease-associated processes and will be instrumental for obtaining a systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases as manifested at the living cell level.

COGS – Risk factors of breast-, ovarian- and prostate cancer

  • COGS logoProject name: Collaborative oncological gene-environment study
  • FP7 Health - Large scale integrating project
  • Project period: 2009-05-01 - 2013-04-30 (48 months)
  • Project funding: 11.71 million Euro
  • 16 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Per Hall
  • Project website

The overarching goal of COGS is to identify individuals with an increased risk of breast, ovary and prostate cancer. Furthermore, we will evaluate the effect of inherited genetic variation on tumour characteristics and clinical outcome.

CommHERE – Communication of European Health Research

  • logo CommHEREProject name: Communication of European Health Research
  • FP7 Health - Coordination and support action (CSA)
  • Project period: 2011-10-01 - 2014-09-30 (36 months)
  • Project funding: EUR 2 million
  • 10 partners
  • Coordinator: Science information officer Ulla Bredberg

The overall aim of CommHERE is to improve communication on the outcome of EU funded health research projects to the media, the general public and other target groups in all of Europe.

EQUIP – Maternal and newborn health in Africa

  • Project name: Expanded quality management using information power for maternal and newborn health in Africa
  • FP7 Health - Small or medium-scale focused research project for specific cooperation actions dedicated to international cooperation partner countries (SICA)
  • Project period: 2010-11-01 - 2014-10-31 (48 months)
  • Project funding: 3 million Euro
  • 5 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Stefan Peterson

The EQUIP project proposes an innovative systemic quality intervention to improve maternal and newborn health in Tanzania and Uganda. The intervention will consist of a quality management approach that links communities and health facilities empowered by locally generated high quality health data from continuous health surveys complemented by data from health facilities.

HIVIND – HIV in India

  • Project name: The antiretroviral roll out for HIV in India - strengthening capacity to promote adherence and patient follow-up in the context
  • FP7 Health - Collaborative project for specific cooperation actions dedicated to international cooperation partner countries (SICA)
  • Project period: 2008-11-01 - 2014-04-30 (66 months)
  • Project funding: 2.95 million Euro
  • 6 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Vinod Diwan

Strengthening capacity to promote adherence and patient follow-up in the context

The main objective of HIVIND is to improve adherence to first line antiretrovirals (ART) among HIV patients in South India using locally relevant innovative means.

As the antiretroviral (ART) program is scaled up, adherence is a key issue that needs to be addressed (as it is a key determinant of resistance, which has public health consequences)

This HIVIND study is a randomized controlled trial of an approach using a contextually relevant intervention (mobile telephones) to influence ART adherence in 600 ART naïve, HIV+ Indian patients eligible for ART, in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu in India. The conventional existing approach (as in the national guidelines) will be compared with an intervention in which the patient is provided adherence support using a mobile telephone interface.

INComb – Combating incontinence

The aims of INComb are to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in overactive bladder incontinence and to improve diagnostics and develop novel therapies. It is a translational project involving both clinical and preclinical academic research groups from several European countries, as well as collaboration with the industry.

ISSC – Infectious diseases in rural China

  • Project name: An integrated surveillance system for infectious disease in rural China: generating evidence for early detection of disease epidemics in resource-poor settings
  • FP7 Health - Small/medium-scale focused research project for specific cooperation actions dedicated to international cooperation partner countries (SICA)
  • Project period: 2010-03-01 - 2014-02-28 (48 months)
  • Project funding: 2.97 million Euro
  • 5 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Vinod Diwan
  • Project website                                        

Generating evidence for early detection of disease epidemics in resource-poor settings

The main objective of ISSC is to improve the early detection of epidemics in rural China by integrating syndromic surveillance with case report surveillance system. This involves the development of an integrated surveillance system as well as implementation and evaluation of this system.

In China, the current surveillance system is based on confirmed case reports and only covers notifiable diseases. In rural China, it is not practical for health units to perform laboratory tests to confirm disease and people are more likely to get old and emerging infectious diseases due to poor living conditions and closer contacts with animals and poultry.

This project will contribute to knowledge, experience and evidence with regard to the development and implementation of an integrated surveillance system for the early warning of epidemics in similar settings.

NeoOpioid – No pain during infancy

Preterm and newborn infant may suffer from pain in the same way as adults. They are even more sensitive to pain due to immaturity of endogenous modulation. Thus, they should have the same human right to be alleviated from pain. The overall aim of this project is to assess effects and safety of opioid treatment in very preterm up to full term newborn infants in relation to pharmacokinetics predisposition.

Furthermore, a major goal is to develop a PUMA for safe administration of opioid analgesic treatment in newborn infant. Both morphine and fentanyl are off-labelled (EMEA) drugs. Several studies have shown that opioid treatment in newborn reduce pain and stress responses. However, these drugs also have side-effects related to plasma concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites. The new approach in the current project is to obtain a more personalized drug therapy to the newborn infant, and to consider individual differences in pharmacokinetics, as well as gender effects.

We will perform a multinational European survey of practices regarding sedation and analgesia in neonatal units. Clinical multicenter trial evaluating safety aspects of morphine and fentanyl will be performed. The responses (evaluated with validated pain scales) will be related to pharmacokinetics predisposition. A "child friendly" formulation adapted for use in neonates will be developed by the SME partner in the NeoOpioid project. The results will be disseminated by scientific and popular articles, the web, videos and special pain courses for physicians and nurses etc. The NeoOpioid project will lead to a considerable improvement of the strategy to alleviate newborn pain.

TORNADO – Gut flora and the immune system

TORNADO will determine the influence of diet on the gut flora and highlight the impact of gut flora on the immune system/other organ systems. TORNADO aims to investigate molecular targets that are subject to regulation by gut flora and diet that sustain health.

WE-Stay – Truancy Among Youth

  • Project name: Work together to Stop Truancy Among Youth
  • FP7 Health - Small or medium-scale focused research project
  • Project period: 2010-05-01 - 2013-04-30 (36 months)
  • Project funding: 3 million Euro
  • 10 partners
  • Coordinator: Professor Danuta Wasserman                            

The main objectives of the WE-STAY project (Working in Europe to Stop Truancy among Youth) are to gather epidemiological information on truancy on European adolescents and to perform school-based intervention programmes for mental health promotion and disease prevention aimed at reducing truancy rates, thus improving mental health among students. The outcomes of the randomized controlled interventions will be evaluated and based on these, recommendations for the prevention of truancy and mental health promotion will be made available.

Truancy is a serious public health problem that affects adolescents from all countries around the world. In the United States, it has been reported that up to 35% of high school students skipped one or more days of school during a school year. It has been suggested that truancy is associated with poor mental health, including depression and suicidal behaviour and also maladjustment, substance abuse, delinquency and crime. Most studies, performed in the USA, proposed mechanistic and law-enforcement interventions to prevent truancy. However, this approach is suggested to have negative consequences on adolescents' well-being and mental health if the accompanying psychological, psychiatric and social problems are not detected and treated.

FundingInternationalProject