Denna sida på svenska
Loading profile information...

About me

In 2002 Dr. Gastaldello got the Molecular Biology Master degree and in 2006 he obtained the PhD in Biology and Molecular Cellular Pathology, both at the University of Padua, Italy.

From 2007 to 2013 Dr. Gastaldello did the PostDoc at Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Karolinska Institute. His project was focused to study the modulation of the Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like networks in Epstein-Barr Virus infected cells.

In 2014 Dr.Gastaldello started his independent research project at Uppsala University and in November he moved at FyFA Department together with Lars Larsson´s group. 


2006-March  PhD in Biology and Molecular Cellular Pathology. University of Padua, Italy. Thesis title “Reconstitution of sarcoglycan complex in HEK-293 cells. Study three alpha-sarcoglycan mutations observed in LGMD-2D”.

2006-March  Evaluation of US Academic Equivalent: Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Biology.

2002-Oct        Molecular Biology degree at the University of Padua (cum laude).

1990-July       High school "I.T.I.S. G. Natta”, Padova. Qualified chemist technician                   with specialization in biochemistry and biology with full marks                   (60/60).

Research description

SUMOylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein functions and contributes to several intracellular process including transcription, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, signal transduction, etc. Particularly, various stress conditions are known to promote global changes in the SUMOylation network, both in cell cultures and at the organs level. Moreover, defect on the SUMOylation machinery have been associated with severe diseases such as neurodegeneration, muscle atrophy, cancer and heart failure.

My research field will be focused to study:

the role of SUMO network during myogenesis in normal and in pathological conditions. 
the modulation of SUMO pathway and the identification of SUMOylated protein in diaphragm and limb muscles in young, middle-aged and old animals under the effects of mechanical ventilation.

The overall aim of this project is to bring more knowledge into the muscle molecular mechanisms that occur during myogenesis and during short/long-term controlled mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit patients.

The results will shed light on basic questions in the muscle field that will lead to better treatment of muscle diseases and greater insights into regenerative medicine.



Academic honors, awards and prizes

VR Young Investigator Grant 2014-2017

Loading publication list...