FEFA - a computer based program for the training and testing of facial affect recognition

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The program is based on a computer based instrument for testing and training of facial affect recognition that has been available within gearman-speaking countries: FEFA (Frankfurter Test und Training des Erkennens von fazialem Affekt). A development of this, FEFA 2, is now available in Swedish, German, Finnish or English and can be ordered here.

FEFA 2 consists of a test module and a training module
Structure of the test module

The test module consists of two sub-modules: TEST: eyes and TEST: faces. In the faces subtest, subjects must identify basic emotions presented on black and white photos of the entire face. It contains 50 items. In the eyes subtest black and white photos only of the eye region are shown. It contains 40 items. After performing the tests, analysis on the number of expected and unexpected responses (amount, and %) and reaction times are automatically produced. Likewise, a separate item analysis for each emotion category is generated.

Structure of the training module

The training module, too, consists of two sub‐modules: TRAINING: eyes and TRAINING: faces. The training module includes about 300 black and white photos with whole faces and those of eyes regions. The training consists of three levels: (A) judgement of pairs of eyes or faces (similar to the test module), (B) assistance for emotion recognition in text form, (C) in-depth comics. If a basic emotion is correctly recognized during the training the participant receives a visual and acoustic reinforcer (smiley face plus nice sound). If the training person gives an unexpected ("incorrect") answer, (A) s/he will be offered assistance by an explanatory text of the photo and the corresponding emotion; (B) s/he has the opportunity to identify a face emotion within a comic (see below for more details). With its help the unrecognised emotion can be re-examined.

Order FEFA 2

A license (for one language) to the program FEFA 2 costs 2.860 SEK (incl. VAT). The program will update automatically. FEFA 2 is available in German, Swedish, Finnish and English. Please read the terms and conditions before you order. To order, please fill out this form or send an email to Anna Råde including invoice address, contact information etc.

Languages

Price VAT Excluded 

Price VAT Included

One language 2.288 SEK 2.860 SEK
All 4 languages 2.792 SEK 3.490 SEK

Contact 

Lic Psychologist

Anna Råde

Phone: +46-(0)8-514 527 12
E-mail: anna.rade@sll.se

References

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  • Bölte S, Feineis-Matthews S, Leber S, Dierks T, Hubl D, Poustka F. (2002). The development and evaluation of a computer-based program to test and to teach the recognition of facial affect. Int J Circumpolar Health, 61:61-68.
  • Bölte S, Feineis-Matthews S, Poustka F. (2003) Frankfurter Test und Training des Erkennens von fazialem Affekt FEFA. KJP
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NeuropsychiatryNeuropsychology