Projects: Unit of Lung and Airway Research

Th17-associated cytokines and host defense in smokers

This project characterizes the pathogenic role of Th17-associated cytokines in the increased susceptibility to infections that signifies long-term smokers, in particular in those who suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with or without chronic bronchitis.

Financing

  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation
  • ALF

Contact person

Professor/senior physician

Anders Lindén

Phone: +46-(0)8-524 822 17
Organizational unit: Lung and Airway Research
E-mail: anders.linden@ki.se

 

The IL-36 family of cytokines in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

This project will assess whether members of the IL-36 family of cytokines are involved in COPD, with and without chronic bronchitis.  Additionally, the project will assess the downstream immunologic effects of IL-36 receptor stimulation in structural lung and immune cells.

Financing

  • European Respiratory Society
  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation

Contact person

 

Cadmium as a pathogenic factor in tobacco smokers

This project explores the pathogenic role of cadmium in the development of COPD, among long-term smokers, in particular the role of cadmium in the distortion of pulmonary host defense.

Financing

  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation
  • ALF

Contact person

Senior lab manager

Bettina Levänen

Phone: +46-(0)8-524 876 02
Organizational unit: Lung and Airway Research
E-mail: bettina.levanen@ki.se

 

Lung development and COPD

This project evaluates how hindered lung development predisposes for the impaired lung function development and the inefficient repair/remodeling process that can be observed in COPD. The project will identify the genetic determinants of lung function development so as to identify the susceptibility genes for COPD, through a mouse to human translational research.

Financing

  • Vinnova
  • ALF

Contact person

Senior researcher

Koustav Ganguly

Organizational unit: Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), C6
E-mail: koustav.ganguly@ki.se

 

Inflammatory mechanisms in chronic bronchitis – studies in vivo and in vitro

Chronic bronchitis is a disease which is characterized by chronic productive cough that often occurs in smokers and as a consequence of occupational exposures, such as farming. Chronic bronchitis is a separate disease entity but co-varies with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As chronic bronchitis increases the risk of development of COPD and is associated with a poor prognosis when occurring in patients with COPD it is of utmost importance to explore the patho-physiological mechanisms behind the condition in patients. By using advanced 3D-models with human primary bronchial epithelial cells of both a normal and a chronic bronchitis-like mucosa and combine those with immune effector cells, these mechanisms can be evaluated in more details and different treatment strategies can be evaluated.

Financing

  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation
  • The Swedish Research Council
  • Swedish Fund for Research without Animal Experiments

Contact person

Senior researcher

Lena Palmberg

Phone: +46-(0)8-524 822 10
Organizational unit: Lung and Airway Research
E-mail: Lena.Palmberg@ki.se

 

New systems for exposing human 3D-models of airway mucosa in health and disease to particulate- and gaseous air pollutants

Exposure to agents via inhalation is of great concerns both in workplace environment and in the daily contact with particles in the ambient air. Reliable human airway exposure systems will most likely replace animal experiment in future toxicity assessment studies of inhaled agents.

Financing

  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation
  • The Swedish Research Council
  • Swedish Fund for Research without Animal Experiments
  • IMM’s strategic grants 2016 for pilot collaboration projects

Contact person

Senior researcher

Lena Palmberg

Phone: +46-(0)8-524 822 10
Organizational unit: Lung and Airway Research
E-mail: Lena.Palmberg@ki.se

 

Detailed study on Toll-like receptor (TLR) mediated immune and pro-inflammatory response to carbon nanoparticle exposure in vitro

The combination of relevant human bronchial mucosa models and sophisticated exposure system can mimic in vivo conditions and serve as a useful alternative animal testing tool when studying adverse effects of nanoparticles, a research field under intense growth. In this study the role of TLR mediated pro-inflammatory and oxidative signaling pathway after carbon nanoparticle exposure is explored by using TLR pathway PCR array assay.

Financing

  • Long-Term Research Fellowship, European Respiratory Society
  • The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation
  • The Swedish Research Council
  • Swedish Fund for Research without Animal Experiments

Contact person

Assistant professor

Swapna Upadhyay

Organizational unit: Lung and Airway Research
E-mail: swapna.upadhyay@ki.se