Examination and Grading System

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Grading system

Chapter 6 Section 19 of the Higher Education Ordinance (SFS 1993:100) states that unless the higher education institution prescribes another grading system, one of the following grades is to be used: fail, pass or pass with distinction.

Grades awarded at KI for courses and study programmes that commenced on 1 July 2007 or later

As of 1 July 2007, KI applies the following grading scale:

  • The fail/pass/pass with distinction scale is used as the principal option. However, a fail/pass or A-F (ECTS) scale may also be applied. All scales are goal-related.
  • Incoming international exchange students can always, regardless of scale, request a grade on the ECTS scale.

The scale applied by a study programme is given in the programme and course syllabuses.

Grades awarded at KI for courses and programmes that commenced before 1 July 2007.

A two-grade scale is applied on courses within programmes leading to professional qualification: Fail and Pass.

A three-grade scale may be applied on single-subject courses and courses on study programmes leading to a general qualification: Fall, Pass and Pass with distinction.

The scale applied is given in the syllabus.

Incoming exchange students can always, regardless of scale, request a grade on the ECTS scale, which awards grades from A to E (pass range) and FX/F (fail range). The scale is goal-related in its application by KI.

Examination regulations

  • Students may not sit where they choose: seating arrangements will be decided on by the invigilators.
  • Bags, outdoor clothing and mobile telephones should be left in the designated place. Mobile telephones should be switched off.
  • Students may not leave the examination room until 30 minutes after the examination begins. If you arrive at the examination more than 30 minutes after the designated start time, you may not take part.
  • You should bring your own pens and eraser, as well as any aids which are specifically permitted in the examination. You may not borrow any aids from other students during the examination.
  • Only the rough paper and writing paper issued in the examination room may be used. No paper may be removed from the examination room before the test has been submitted.
  • Conversations or other forms of communication may not take place between students, either in the examination room or during toilet visits.
  • You may not work with other students, unless instructed to the contrary by the invigilator.
  • Once completed, the examination should be submitted with a code number. If it is not to be marked anonymously, state your name and civic registration number. Blank examinations should also be submitted as these count as an instance of sitting a test.
  • When submitting examinations, you should show valid ID. If you are unable to do that, a note will be made of your name and you will be asked to sign the examination. It won't be marked until you have shown your ID.
  • Anyone who is suspected of cheating is entitled to complete the test. The test will not be marked, but will be kept in a sealed envelope pending a decision.
  • Anyone who obviously disrupts or delays tests, or who fails to adhere to KI's examination regulations, may be asked to stop the test immediately and leave the examination room.

Marking

Exam papers are marked as soon as possible after submission. Only in exceptional cases may the marking process take longer than ten working days.

Reconsideration and correction of grades

Reconsideration

You may not appeal an awarded grade, but you may request to have it reviewed.

If an examiner finds that a decision on a grade is obviously incorrect owing to new circumstances or for some other reason, he or she is to change the decision if this can be done quickly and easily and if it does not mean lowering the grade. (Higher Education Ordinance Chapter 6 Section 24).

There is no time limit for requesting a grade review. However, the longer you wait, the harder it is to review the grade, since (for instance) the assignment might no longer remain in the files. A review should therefore be requested, if necessary, as soon after the decision as possible. If you receive at least a Pass grade, you may not have it downgraded to a Fail at your own request.

Correction

A decision that contains a manifest error in writing, calculation or any other similar oversight by the authority or someone else may be corrected by the authority, which made the decision. Before a correction takes place the authority shall give the parties an opportunity to express themselves on the issue, provided that the matter concerns the exercise of public power in relation to someone and the measure is not unnecessary. (Administrative Procedure Act, Section 26).

"Plussing"

A re-sit in order to raise a passing grade ("plussing") is not permitted.

Resits

The number of resits to be held during a term is given in the timetable.

Number of course re-takes

A student may re-take a course for which he or she lacks at least a Pass grade.

If after three or four resits you fail to obtain at least a Pass grade, you may re-take the course (or the failed modules) one more time, provided that a place is available for you.

However, KI's local guidelines limit the number of resits to six. Re-taking a single-subject course can be difficult as there can be no assurance when or if it will be held again.

Limits on the number of resits

There is a limit to the number of times you have the right to sit an examination in order to pass a course.

According to KI's guidelines, you are entitled to a total of six resits per module in order to obtain at least a Pass. You are entitled to take on-site training modules (work placements or similar) no more than twice. Limits to the number of exams or placements is given in the syllabus.

If you enrol for an exam but do not take part, you are deemed not to have sat the exam. You do not have to have sat an ordinary exam to be able to take a resit.

For further information, see the Higher Education Ordinance, Chapter 6, Section 21.

Resitting an exam for a course that has been dropped or changed

Three additional exams should be given for courses that are dropped from the syllabuses or that have undergone significant revision, or for courses with a radically revised reading list, on the former content and literature over a period of at least one year from when such change occurs.

Examiners

The examiner is the teacher who sets the grade.

Examiners are appointed by the head of department. The right to compose or mark exams or to orally examine students can be delegated to another teacher/other teachers, but it is the examiner who, apart from setting the grade, is responsible for ensuring that the exam is reasonably worded and that its marking/assessment is consistent.

An examiner in a position of bias towards a student may not mark and grade this students examination papers. Bias includes kinship, friendship/enmity, or having a personal interest in the results of the grading decision.

Replacing an examiner

The Higher Education Ordinance entitles you to request to have another examiner appointed if you have taken and failed two examinations for a course or part of a course, unless there are special reasons to the contrary. At KI, this also applies if you have taken an on-site course/module without obtaining at least a Pass grade.

Compulsory course components

The compulsory course components are given in the syllabus.

The syllabus also explains how you can make up/re-take compulsory components that you have missed, and if these compulsory components must be completed before you can take a final exam for the course.

If you are an elected representative at KI, you are under obligation to attend the meetings convened by KI and must therefore be given the opportunity to compensate for any compulsory course components you might therefore miss. If you are a mentor on an induction programme, you may be absent from the course as much as is necessary and, again, you are entitled to compensate for any compulsory components you might therefore miss.

Examination papers

Written questions in exams and other assessments are covered by the principle of non-disclosure, which means that exam papers become public once distributed to the students sitting the exam.

You are entitled to ask for your original exam papers to be returned to you once they have been marked and graded. Papers not collected within two years after the date of grading are destroyed.

Student rights